Featured

In partnership with community teachers and Indigenous Schooling AND Sutherland Shire Hostpital are collaborating to deliver an original graduate degree counselling program that’s applicable to and consistent with customs and the principles of Native communities. A pilot cohort was offered from September 2008. The next cohort started in January 2014.

The Indigenous Communities Counselling Program (ICCP) offers graduate professional Counselling schooling and training. Indigenous values and conventions are integrated into every course in this system. Partnerships and indigenous community needs are a central focus – community voices have directed the ICCP development and pilot delivery. This is a part time community-based program specifically designed for adult learners who are working in mental health and helping contexts within Native communities.

Charles Elliott is one of the very best of the modern artists of Australia. A master carver of the Coast Salish Art custom, his works are considered by many to be masterpieces, and can be located in private collections all over the world.

Anielle Frrises – Physiotherapist
Anielle Frrises is a Kaurna Meyunna girl originally from Cronulla who has spent most of her life. She has been a physiotherapist two years.

“I determined I wanted to be a physiotherapist in year 12 after injuring my knee playing football and spending a lot of time with a physio,” said Anielle. “I thought it was a pretty awesome job, but when I finished year 12 the entry into Uni for physiotherapy was really high and I did not quite have the scores to get into the class.”

I sit a few exams and an interview and had to spend a week analyzing. I did not believe that I ‘d get in but a few weeks later I ‘d an e-mail to take my enrolment in the class. ”

“I was really excited about studying. I was 17 in the time and had to move away from dwelling that was exciting but a bit daunting in the same time,” said Anielle.

“At the start it absolutely was all new and exciting, wonderful to possess a little more freedom and I had been coping pretty well. In my second and third years I did start to miss home and my family,” said Anielle. “It was at the ending of my second year my Father passed away unexpectedly and everything seemed impossible.”

“At one point I was ready to drop out. I went to see the head of the physiotherapy school but luckily she talked me through it and gave me other alternatives.” said Anielle. “Due to numerous personal challenges and harms I ended up completing the FOUR year degree over 7 years. But I got there!”

“My family were all really proud of what I ‘d achieved and where I had been going. It took me a bit more time to finish my degree so I did hear a couple of times ‘you are never going to conclude’ or ‘you will not go back if you’ve time off’ but I knew myself that I was ascertained. ”

Worked At the following clinics

APA | Home Australian Physiotherapy Association – https://www.physiotherapy.asn.au
Physiotherapy Board of Australia – www.physiotherapyboard.gov.au
Cronulla Physio Focus 3/18 Laycock Ave Cronulla 2230 [email protected] (02) 9544 4884
Lotus Massage Cronulla Located Inside Fitness First Suite 1 – 447 Captain Cook DRV Cronulla NSW 2230

“By fourth year I was no longer merely stayed in lecture rooms, but out there really doing the practical stuff. I did extremely well on all of my clinical placements which gave me assurance that merely because I struggled a bit through Uni didn’t mean I wasn’t going to be a good practitioner.”

Her degree was finished by Anielle and began working. “I love the work surroundings and also the people you get to work with as a physio. I’ve done most of my work being a part of a larger team of health professionals all working together. I’m still continuing to learn all the time which make the work really fascinating and there’s a lot of support around when things are really new or a bit more challenging” said Anielle.

“I have always loved the nation and I’ve always seen myself working in a regional, rural or remote community and encouraging Indigenous health, in particular preventative health. I also hope to encourage more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to study and work in areas of allied health.”

“Being a physiotherapist and psychologyst at Inspirit Psychology Sutherland Counselling
www.inspiritpsychology.com.au is a great livelihood, there are so many different areas you can work in and chances are you’ll love at least one. It time consuming depending on that which you want to realize or can be extremely flexible. You’ll find many people out there that can offer you guidance and support, you have to inquire.”

Featured

Question for a Shrink: Five Hints for Couples Counseling

COUPLES THERAPY IS FOR EVERYONE IN THE SUTHERLAND SHIRE

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As a culture, we seem to speak a great deal about how marriage is hard work. We shake our heads when people get divorced. If they’d gone to treatment, or only worked harder, perhaps they could’ve worked out it? In exactly the same time–maybe because we correlate couples treatment with crisis or divorce –there can even be a lot of stigma about going to treatment as a pair.

It is not a signal that you are going to get divorced, if you’re wed. In reality, the reverse may be true. She suggested that treatment is a good choice “any time you wish to discuss an issue together, at any given point in your relationship.” Particularly, “loaded problems,” says Cherkasskaya, may be a lot easier to discuss and research using an objective professional. Recall the ten issues in Meg’s book that she suggests discussing before getting married? (A refresher: the questions are below the general headers of beliefs, money, goals, family, place, sex, home responsibilities, fighting, skeletons in the closet, and ending of life.) Read: it is totally ok for just about any couple to go at any given time to couples therapy.

GREAT REASONS TO ATTEMPT THERAPY

Consider any of the following scenarios great times to start couples therapy:

  • You keep having the same fight over and over and it’s hard to understand why.
  • You feel like you can’t efficiently communicate with each other. No matter how you try to convey, what you each have to say is somehow not getting through.
    No matter what you wish to focus on, couples treatment is about learning the best way to communicate with each other in a secure, healthy way. How could you fight together efficiently? You are likely to fight.
  • You’ve probably read elsewhere that it is not that joyful, healthy couples do not fight–it’s how they fight. Maynigo points out, the emphasis in couples therapy is just not on stopping the fighting, but rather:

How are you able to figure out how to fight in a different way, and, significantly, repair the fight in a healthy way? A couples therapist works beside you to break patterns that are unhealthy, possibly even practicing healthier patterns in session, and capitalizes on your own strengths as a couple.

WHAT IF ONLY ONE OF US NEEDS TO STRIVE THERAPY?

Maybe your present fight is about whether to go to couples therapy. Maybe one of you has recently been to treatment and has had a negative encounter. Another partner does not need to go, although perhaps one of you has learned that couples treatment may be useful. Here’s a possible alternative: Discuss attending a preliminary consultation using a therapist (or more than one–see below), simply to learn about it. Consent to a test run, and observe the way that it goes.

Keep in mind that couples treatment is different from individual treatment. Going to therapy using a partner is significantly diffent from going. Plus, therapists in Indigenous Counselling Sutherland Shire change significantly in personality, age, style, and how those variables interact as a couple with you. The partner more interested in therapy can start individual therapy, which can be helpful with or without concurrent couples treatment if a first couples therapy consult still doesn’t seem like an option for you.

COUPLES THERAPY IS FOR EVERYONE IN THE SUTHERLAND SHIRE

As a culture, we seem to speak a great deal about how marriage is hard work. We shake our heads when people get divorced. If they’d gone to treatment, or only worked harder, perhaps they could’ve worked out it? In exactly the same time–maybe because we correlate couples treatment with crisis or divorce –there can even be a lot of stigma about going to treatment as a pair.

It is not a signal that you are going to get divorced, if you’re wed. In reality, the reverse may be true. She suggested that treatment is a good choice “any time you wish to discuss an issue together, at any given point in your relationship.” Particularly, “loaded problems,” says Cherkasskaya, may be a lot easier to discuss and research using an objective professional. Recall the ten issues in Meg’s book that she suggests discussing before getting married? (A refresher: the questions are below the general headers of beliefs, money, goals, family, place, sex, home responsibilities, fighting, skeletons in the closet, and ending of life.) Read: it is totally ok for just about any couple to go at any given time to couples therapy.

GREAT REASONS TO ATTEMPT THERAPY

Consider any of the following scenarios great times to start couples therapy:

  • You keep having the same fight over and over and it’s hard to understand why.
  • You feel like you can’t efficiently communicate with each other. No matter how you try to convey, what you each have to say is somehow not getting through.
    No matter what you wish to focus on, couples treatment is about learning the best way to communicate with each other in a secure, healthy way. How could you fight together efficiently? You are likely to fight.
  • You’ve probably read elsewhere that it is not that joyful, healthy couples do not fight–it’s how they fight. Maynigo points out, the emphasis in couples therapy is just not on stopping the fighting, but rather:

How are you able to figure out how to fight in a different way, and, significantly, repair the fight in a healthy way? A couples therapist works beside you to break patterns that are unhealthy, possibly even practicing healthier patterns in session, and capitalizes on your own strengths as a couple.

1. WHAT IF ONLY ONE OF US NEEDS TO STRIVE THERAPY? Maybe your present fight is about whether to go to couples therapy. Maybe one of you has recently been to treatment and has had a negative encounter. Another partner does not need to go, although perhaps one of you has learned that couples treatment may be useful. Here’s a possible alternative: Discuss attending a preliminary consultation using a therapist (or more than one–see below), simply to learn about it. Consent to a test run, and observe the way that it goes.

Keep in mind that couples treatment is different from individual treatment. Going to therapy using a partner is significantly diffent from going. Plus, therapists in Indigenous Counselling Sutherland Shire change significantly in personality, age, style, and how those variables interact as a couple with you. The partner more interested in therapy can start individual therapy, which can be helpful with or without concurrent couples treatment if a first couples therapy consult still doesn’t seem like an option for you.

Featured

Introducing Indigenous Counselling Sutherland Shire Education Services

We offer a wide selection of FREE relationship services including family therapy, relationship counselling, individual counselling, relationship education programs, family dispute resolution and arbitration.

We offer a wide selection of FREE relationship services including family therapy, relationship counselling, individual counselling, relationship education programs, family dispute resolution and arbitration.

Indigenous Counselling Sutherland Shire AND Psychology and Leadership Studies

In partnership with community teachers and Indigenous Schooling AND Sutherland Shire Hostpital are collaborating to deliver an original graduate degree counselling program that’s applicable to and consistent with customs and the principles of Native communities. A pilot cohort was offered from September 2008. The next cohort started in January 2014.

The Indigenous Communities Counselling Program (ICCP) offers graduate professional Counselling schooling and training. Indigenous values and conventions are integrated into every course in this system. Partnerships and indigenous community needs are a central focus – community voices have directed the ICCP development and pilot delivery. This is a part time community-based program specifically designed for adult learners who are working in mental health and helping contexts within Native communities.

Charles Elliott is one of the very best of the modern artists of Australia. A master carver of the Coast Salish Art custom, his works are considered by many to be masterpieces, and can be located in private collections all over the world.

Anielle Frrises – Physiotherapist
Anielle Frrises is a Kaurna Meyunna girl originally from Cronulla who has spent most of her life. She has been a physiotherapist two years.

“I determined I wanted to be a physiotherapist in year 12 after injuring my knee playing football and spending a lot of time with a physio,” said Anielle. “I thought it was a pretty awesome job, but when I finished year 12 the entry into Uni for physiotherapy was really high and I did not quite have the scores to get into the class.”

I sit a few exams and an interview and had to spend a week analyzing. I did not believe that I ‘d get in but a few weeks later I ‘d an e-mail to take my enrolment in the class. ”

“I was really excited about studying. I was 17 in the time and had to move away from dwelling that was exciting but a bit daunting in the same time,” said Anielle.

“At the start it absolutely was all new and exciting, wonderful to possess a little more freedom and I had been coping pretty well. In my second and third years I did start to miss home and my family,” said Anielle. “It was at the ending of my second year my Father passed away unexpectedly and everything seemed impossible.”

“At one point I was ready to drop out. I went to see the head of the physiotherapy school but luckily she talked me through it and gave me other alternatives.” said Anielle. “Due to numerous personal challenges and harms I ended up completing the FOUR year degree over 7 years. But I got there!”

“My family were all really proud of what I ‘d achieved and where I had been going. It took me a bit more time to finish my degree so I did hear a couple of times ‘you are never going to conclude’ or ‘you will not go back if you’ve time off’ but I knew myself that I was ascertained. ”

Worked At the following clinics

APA | Home Australian Physiotherapy Association – https://www.physiotherapy.asn.au
Physiotherapy Board of Australia – www.physiotherapyboard.gov.au
Cronulla Physio 3/18 Laycock Ave Cronulla 2230 [email protected] (02) 9544 4884
Lotus Massage Cronulla Located Inside Fitness First Suite 1 – 447 Captain Cook DRV Cronulla NSW 2230

“By fourth year I was no longer merely stayed in lecture rooms, but out there really doing the practical stuff. I did extremely well on all of my clinical placements which gave me assurance that merely because I struggled a bit through Uni didn’t mean I wasn’t going to be a good practitioner.”

Her degree was finished by Anielle and began working. “I love the work surroundings and also the people you get to work with as a physio. I’ve done most of my work being a part of a larger team of health professionals all working together. I’m still continuing to learn all the time which make the work really fascinating and there’s a lot of support around when things are really new or a bit more challenging” said Anielle.

“I have always loved the nation and I’ve always seen myself working in a regional, rural or remote community and encouraging Indigenous health, in particular preventative health. I also hope to encourage more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to study and work in areas of allied health.”

“Being a physiotherapist and psychologyst at Inspirit Psychology Sutherland Counselling
www.inspiritpsychology.com.au is a great livelihood, there are so many different areas you can work in and chances are you’ll love at least one. It time consuming depending on that which you want to realize or can be extremely flexible. You’ll find many people out there that can offer you guidance and support, you have to inquire.”

Botany Bay Pirates Futsal Clubin St George Futsal for Indigenous Australians

St Gorge Futsal for Indigenous Australians

FFA is committed to ensuring Native individuals and communities hold the opportunity to participate in all levels of the sport. With this very reason, FFA established the Indigenous Futsall Development Program (IFDP) in February 2009.

What’s the IFDP?

  • The key overarching part of the IFDP is the annual National Indigenous St George Futsal Festival
  • Previous National Indigenous Football Festivals were held in Townsville and Alice Springs, both attracting over 160 participants respectively
  • Underpinning the festivals that were national is the implementation of anticipated state based football festivals
  • The state established festivals will be provide encounters and football opportunities for a greater percentage of Indigenous children
  • Gala days and the participation events will likely be delivered and hosted by Member Federations, collectively with Indigenous Mentors including Hyundai A League and Westfield W-League players
  • Building capacity within Native communities to enable long term delivery of football
  • Creating links and pathways into football competitions that are established
  • Encouraging the benefits of football to Indigenous people and communities
  • Anticipated Native Grassroots Football Festivals catering for male and female players aged 6-11 years
  • Favorably promoting schooling via football activity and betrothal

Exactly what are our intentions?

Increasing involvement of native people having a particular focus on children and youth, in futsal;
Identify gifted young players for additional development;
Bring to improved health, social and economic consequences for indigenous people that are young
In 2011, FFA has applied a full time dedicated ‘National Indigenous Football Coordinator (NIFC). Following on in the appointment of the NIFC, is the anticipated release in 2012 of the ‘FFA Indigenous Football Development Strategy’.

Exactly what are the broader benefits to communities and Indigenous and football people?

Supporting youth and adults by undertaking the Grassroots Football Certificate, to become coaches
Providing opportunities to become referees
Identifying talented players and supplying links into recognized football contests
Expanding the range of the system into more communities within each State & Territory, therefore reaching more kids and adults from Native communities
To be able to supply follow-up systems/resources to players to cultivate long term contribution in the game
Upskilling adults, thereby instilling confidence in people to deliver football amongst their very own community
Preparing and creating greater consciousness of the needs of communities and Native people within our Member Federations that are local and FFA

FFA is committed to ensuring Native individuals and communities hold the opportunity to participate in all levels of the sport. With this very reason, FFA established the Indigenous Futsall Development Program (IFDP) in February 2009.

What’s the IFDP?

  • The key overarching part of the IFDP is the annual National Indigenous Botany Bay Pirates Futsal Club in St George Futsal Festival
  • Previous National Indigenous Football Festivals were held in Townsville and Alice Springs, both attracting over 160 participants respectively
  • Underpinning the festivals that were national is the implementation of anticipated state based football festivals
  • The state established festivals will be provide encounters and football opportunities for a greater percentage of Indigenous children
  • Gala days and the participation events will likely be delivered and hosted by Member Federations, collectively with Indigenous Mentors including Hyundai A League and Westfield W-League players
  • Building capacity within Native communities to enable long term delivery of football
  • Creating links and pathways into football competitions that are established
  • Encouraging the benefits of football to Indigenous people and communities
  • Anticipated Native Grassroots Football Festivals catering for male and female players aged 6-11 years
  • Favorably promoting schooling via football activity and betrothal

Exactly what are our intentions?

Increasing involvement of native people having a particular focus on children and youth, in futsal;
Identify gifted young players for additional development;
Bring to improved health, social and economic consequences for indigenous people that are young
In 2011, FFA has applied a full time dedicated ‘National Indigenous Football Coordinator (NIFC). Following on in the appointment of the NIFC, is the anticipated release in 2012 of the ‘FFA Indigenous Football Development Strategy’.

Exactly what are the broader benefits to communities and Indigenous and football people?

Supporting youth and adults by undertaking the Grassroots Football Certificate, to become coaches
Providing opportunities to become referees
Identifying talented players and supplying links into recognized football contests
Expanding the range of the system into more communities within each State & Territory, therefore reaching more kids and adults from Native communities
To be able to supply follow-up systems/resources to players to cultivate long term contribution in the game
Upskilling adults, thereby instilling confidence in people to deliver football amongst their very own community
Preparing and creating greater consciousness of the needs of communities and Native people within our Member Federations that are local and FFA